PLANTATION HOME IN 18TH CENTURY VIRGINIA

          

          

Mount- Airy Plantation

The organization of a typical plantation home reveals the "racially and socially stratified population" of 18th century Virginia. The organization of plantation land showed the white planter's interest in "defending a rigid social hierarchy forwarded by movement as a disguise for maintaining rigid and social hierarchy."   This land was a "contrived collection of buildings and spaces ordered by sequences of social barriers; rows of trees, terraces, dependencies, the kitchen, house itself… carefully orchestrated exercise in the definition of status every barrier successful passed was a mark of preference.” Space around buildings was as important as a building itself –socialized from the master's point of view, slave quarters were part of a working landscape that dictated to some degree their setting and location. Quarters for house slaves were often close to the main house on large plantations, and they  were carefully ordered in rows or “streets.” If they were visible from the house, they were arranged on the site and treated on their exteriors with an eye to visual effect from the main house” (XI).

 Movement patterns of Plantation Home (XI)

 

 

                              

   Plantation Home  Benin  •  Asante  Washington DC

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